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to help strangers. one of those good samaritans has quite a story himself. and here's terrell brown. >> reporter: this photo is one of the first captured shortly after the blasts went off. the man in the cow boy hat is 52-year-old carlos arrendondo who ran toward the chaos when others were running away. >> blood is everywhere. people asking for help. people crying. and people running away. the smoke and the smell, too, was very powerful there. >> reporter: america has heard arrendondo's story before when his 20-year-old son was killed in iraq in 2004 he was inconsolable. in agony and rage he set a van on fire and received help through counseling. search years later his other son committed suicide. arrendondo was at the marathon as part of a healing process giving out flags at the finish line in honor of veterans. when the bomb went off he ran to the aid of a man lying on the sidewalk missing his legs. >> i went to the ground to comfort him. he's okay. the ambulance is on the way. stay still. don't move. i ended up picking him up from the ground to put him in a wheelchair. they just
yesterday's attack, an elderly runner, knocked to the ground with the impact of the explosion. terrell brown spoke to that man. >> reporter: at the first bomb explosion near the finish line, one runner is seen falling to the ground. legs buckled by the blast. the runner is 78-year-old bill efrin. >> shocked when it just hit my whole body. and my legs just started gittering around. i knew i was going down. >> reporter: a veteran of 45 marathons. efrin traveled from his home of washington state, to run the marathon for the third time. >> i was just approaching the last straightaway to the finish line. and i had had a good day. and i was feeling really good. >> reporter: fewer than 20 feet from the finish line when the explosion forced him down. he says his injuries were minor. >> didn't feel any severe pain. but as i rolled over, i seen a little scratch in my leg. but nothing too bad. so i laid there, just momentarily. >> reporter: efrig was immediately surrounded by first responders, then helped up by marathon officials remember as the wounded were taken away from the scene in the remaining r
sportscaster, jd brown. >> we want them to get the tools and resources from all of us in terms of what we can do to shape healthy men out there. >> a group called a call to men, is the organizer. this is one of its cofounders. >> while the overwhelming majority of violence against women is men's violence, the overwhelming majority of men are not violent being but we're silent about the other violence other men perpetrate. organize may not get 400 in the room to hear about domestic violence. but get jb here to interview new raven linebacker, chris canty, ask you'll fill the room to hear the message. >> i want to use the platform or play in the national football league on to make a difference in young peopley lives in the communities. i realize it's a unique opportunity in the community, when you have the attention of young men. you have the attention of men that look up to you as well, that you can mobilize that and use that for something really positive. >> reporter: at the sheraton downtown, mike schuh, wjz eyewitness news. >> and that conference will reach about 1200 coaches. its next stop
on the orange there. his name is bill iffrig. he's 78 years old. terrell brown is here with that story. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. bill iffrig was about to finish his third run in the boston marathon when the first explosion went off and literally knocked him off his feet. as the first bomb exploded near the finish line one runner is seen falling to the ground. legs buckled by the blast. the runner is 78-year-old bill iffrig. >> shock waves just hit my whole body and my legs just started jittering around. i knew i was going down. >> reporter: a veteran of 45 marathons. iffrig traveled from his home in washington state to run the boston marathon for a third time. >> i was just approaching the last straightaway to the finish line. i had a good day. i was feeling really good. >> reporter: fewer than 20 feet from the finish line when the explosion forced him down. iffrig says his injuries were minor. >> didn't feel any severe pain. as i rolled over i seen a scratch on my leg. nothing too bad. i laid there just momentarily. >> iffrig was surrounded by first responde
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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